ComPARe

The Canadian Population Attributable Risk of Cancer (ComPARe) study estimates the number and percentage of cancer cases in Canada in 2015 due to more than 20 modifiable lifestyle, environmental and infectious agent risk factors.

The study also estimates how changes to these risk factors through prevention could affect the number of cancer cases in the future (up to 2042).

ComPARe aimed to:

  • estimate the current and future number and percentage of new cancer cases due to modifiable risk factors across Canada
  • show how prevention strategies can reduce the number of future cancer cases
  • work with partners in the health system to share and use the data

The ComPARe study results are for anyone interested in cancer prevention. Cancer researchers can use this information to support their work. Healthcare providers can use it to educate their patients. Healthcare decision-makers can use it to determine which programs and services to prioritize. And you can use it to understand what you can do to reduce your cancer risk.

The ComPARe study was composed of 5 subject-specific teams. Each team led part of the study and was overseen by the study coordination team.

Lifestyle

Dr. Christine Friedenreich
Dr. Christine Friedenreich

Co-Principal investigator

Alberta Health Services

Dr. Darren Brenner
Dr. Darren Brenner

Co-Principal investigator

University of Calgary

Abbey Poirier
Abbey Poirier

Alberta Health Services

Dr. Yibing Ruan
Dr. Yibing Ruan

Alberta Health Services

Xin Grevers
Xin Grevers

Alberta Health Services

Farah Khandwala
Farah Khandwala

Alberta Health Services

Joy Pader
Joy Pader

Alberta Health Services

Environment

Dr. Will King
Dr. Will King

Queen’s University

Dr. Paul Villeneuve
Dr. Paul Villeneuve

Carleton University

Dr. Paul Demers
Dr. Paul Demers

Occupational Cancer Research Centre

Dr. Perry Hystad
Dr. Perry Hystad

Oregon State University

Dylan O’Sullivan
Dylan O’Sullivan

Queen’s University

Priyanka Gogna
Priyanka Gogna

Queen’s University

Tasha Narain
Tasha Narain

Queen’s University

Infections

Dr. Eduardo Franco
Dr. Eduardo Franco

McGill University

Karena Volesky
Karena Volesky

McGill University

Dr. Mariam El-Zein
Dr. Mariam El-Zein

McGill University

Knowledge Translation

Dr. Prithwish De
Dr. Prithwish De

Cancer Care Ontario

Dr. Leah Smith
Dr. Leah Smith

Canadian Cancer Society

Elizabeth Holmes
Elizabeth Holmes

Canadian Cancer Society

Dr. Robert Nuttall
Dr. Robert Nuttall

Health Quality Ontario

Zeinab El-Masri
Zeinab El-Masri

Cancer Care Ontario

Methods

Dr. Stephen Walter
Dr. Stephen Walter

McMaster University

The ComPARe study teams brought together experts across Canada in cancer epidemiology, biostatistics, cancer risk factors and knowledge translation.

The ComPARe study examined more than 20 risk factors related to lifestyle, the environment and infectious agents and more than 30 cancer types associated with these risk factors.

Risk factors were selected based on the scientific evidence of their impact on cancer risk and their potential preventability.

Overview of risk factors and cancer types.

The number of cancer cases due to a risk factor was estimated using a statistical measure called the population attributable risk (PAR), from which ComPARe derives its name. Learn more in our overview of the ComPARe methods, or see this BMJ Open article for details about the methods.

ComPARe was funded by a CCS-Partner Prevention Research Grant from the Canadian Cancer Society (grant #703106).

Burden of occupational cancer

The Burden of Occupational Cancer study aimed to determine the number and percentage of cancers that are caused by exposure to carcinogens (cancer-causing substances) in the workplace. It also estimated the economic costs associated with occupational cancers.

The study was a collaboration between researchers at the Occupational Cancer Research Centre (at Cancer Care Ontario), CAREX Canada, the Institute for Work & Health, the University of British Columbia, l’Université de Montréal, l’Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail and Imperial College London.

Find out more about the Burden of Occupational Cancer study.

The study looked at cancer cases caused by exposure to 34 workplace carcinogens. Ten of them are included in the dashboard.

The Burden of Occupational Cancer study was led by the Occupational Cancer Research Centre (OCRC) and was supported by a Multisector Team Grant in Prevention Research from the Canadian Cancer Society (grant #701285-00).